Archive for the ‘advocate’ Category


I stumbled across this article on a new-to-me blog that I’m now following. It has some great tips that I never considered when thinking about going to the emergency room as someone who has chronic pain and related issues. This blog entry is talking about CRPS, which is Complex Regional Pain Syndrome. It’s a chronic pain disorder that is separate from Fibromyalgia but can be a co-diagnosis with Fibromyalgia. Each disorder can also be misdiagnosed for the other. She goes into more detail with each bullet point, and you should click the link to see the reasoning why. I’ve begun using these suggestions at work and although it’s been a couple of years since I’ve broken down and gone to the ER, I’m going to be taking this advice.

Considering the Emergency Room? Here Are Some Pointers to Keep in Mind if You Have Chronic Pain. |.

 

  1. Make sure that you have a regular physician who treats your chronic pain.
  2. Show that you have tried to contact your regular doctor before you go to the ER … only using the emergency room as your treatment of last resort, as opposed to the primary place you go for pain medication.
  3. Bring a letter from your doctor.
  4. Bring a list of medications.
  5. Work cooperatively with emergency room staff. It might not be fair, but if a patient comes in screaming and shouting that they need pain medication right away, the staff isn’t going to like it.
  6. If you have a CRPS card, hand it to them and ask for it to be put in your file.
  7. Ask for a nurse advocate or make sure someone is with you.
  8. If at all possible, use the same Emergency Department as the last one you went to, your pain will be that much more believable if you always use the same place.
  9. …keep a folder handy with all those details written down, as well as a copy of most everything I need to bring with me

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Mini vent: There’s a support group I belong to, and the vent I need to make isn’t very supportive. :p  Frequently people in this forum complain about the lack of government funding towards Fibromyalgia research. There are frequently petitions that are essentially and literally only “Fibromyalgia Awareness should be important! Get the word out!” and then 8,264 people sign that one while 2,937 more sign one that says, “Make the Government Aware of Fibromyalgia! Make the Government Support Fibromyalgia!” and every single one of them are angry.

The most recent post that tipped my kitten was:

“THE GOVT CUT THE FUNDING FOR YOUR DISEASE TO $0. GET MAD.”

Well… what I WANT to say is:

Don’t rely on the government. If you want funding to go to the right places, to the independent scientists that are invested in the research for Fibromyalgia or Autism or Crohn’s Disease or Alzheimer’s Disease or anything at all that you have an interest in then you do the research to find out who can be trusted, who is legitimate and taken seriously in the scientific community among their peers, and you donate to them yourself. Don’t invite the government into your home unless you have no other choice.

Fibromyalgia awareness and acceptance isn’t something you petition for. It’s something that you talk about. You educate people about. You create noise about it. You advocate regarding Fibromyalgia, and you self-advocate. You share information and research from peer-reviewed scientists and get your doctors involved in the discussion.

The government IS AWARE of Fibromyalgia. They’re not ignoring it. In fact, there was this huge announcement back in 2012 about Fibromyalgia being added to the list of recognized disabilities eligible for Social Security Supplemental Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Income (SSDI). That’s a big fat statement right there that the government recognizes and accepts Fibromyalgia as legitimate.

Finally, if the government cut funding to NASA, who is responsible for things like better mattresses, coats, boots, and many other social advances that make us happy, the government sure as hell isn’t going to fund Fibromyalgia research.

I’m not going to get mad. It’s not that I don’t want the funding. I think it would be fabulous. We need it. We just need more discussion and education and advocacy out there and we need to do more than create silly petitions that only rile people up and don’t accomplish anything real.

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I can’t tell you how much I appreciated this post from Asperger’s: Through My Eyes. It offered insights I hadn’t realized before.

Aspergers and Lack Of Awareness of Body Signals | Aspergers: Through My Eyes.

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I think it’s important to share the opinions of Actually Autistic people. I’m non-autistic, so even though I’m a parent of an autistic daughter, my opinion doesn’t mean quite as much as that of Actually Autistic people. Before I share my thoughts, this is a great blog entry, shared with permission, from Thoughts from an Autistic Vegan: What’s wrong with Autism Speaks from an Autistic point of view. I’d like to thank Autistic Vegan again for letting me share this.

Saturday, July 11, 2015

What’s wrong with Autism Speaks from an Autistic point of view

It seems everyone is aware of autism these days. I can’t think of anyone I have met, who has never heard of autism.  Autism Speaks has made sure that we are all aware.  Their latest awareness piece came in the form of an article in People magazine, proclaiming Bob and Suzanne Wright to be heroes, battling the autism epidemic.  Battling. Epidemic. The hate speech never ends with Autism Speaks.  It is as if they are unaware that Autistic people don’t want you to go to war with our brains.  My family became aware of our own autism, right at the same time that Autism Speaks was getting off the ground, and becoming a widely known entity.  So they made sure that we knew that autism was something to be afraid of.  My Autistic son was 5 years old in 2009, when Autism Speaks stated, “I am autism…. I work faster than pediatric aids, cancer, and diabetes combined.  And if you’re happily married, I will make sure that your marriage fails.”  http://autisticadvocacy.org/2009/09/horrific-autism-speaks-i-am-autism-ad-transcript/ Where are the help and the resources? OT services could be provided for families to get help with understanding their children’s sensory needs.  Communication devices to help people communicate more effectively with their families would certainly help many of us. No, fear is all Autism Speaks has to offer.   Autism Speaks raises millions of dollars with their pity campaigns, and yet, only gives 4% back to families in the communities. http://loveexplosions.net/2014/10/31/oops-they-did-it-again-autism-speaks-2013-financials-just-released/

My son was only 2 years old when Autism Speaks made a documentary called Autism Every Day.  This movie is a pity party for parents of Autistic children, the worst part being when a mom talks about wanting to drive her Autistic child off a bridge, while her Autistic daughter is in the room, and says she only did not do that because of her other, non-Autistic child. http://tinyurl.com/nnhveky These are the things that do the most damage.  Autistic children are murdered by their parents at an alarming rate.  Yet, in the media, which Autism Speaks is always at the center of, this is excused.  People lament the lack of services, think of the martyr parents, and shake their heads at the unfortunate lot in life to have an Autistic child. http://www.autistichoya.com/2013/03/honoring-dead.html In their most recent documentary, Sounding the Alarm, there is more of the same.  Over and over again, the message from Autism Speaks is that autism is an epidemic to be battled.  They don’t take the time to talk to Autistic people of any age to get their opinions on what services are needed, or what message should be sent to the world at large. Instead, they speak to weeping parents, and call for more services as they exploit Autistic people’s darkest moments for profit. They show a complete and utter disrespect for Autistic people in every action that they take.  Because of this, it is very difficult for me to tell people that I am Autistic.  I know it changes their opinion of me, because of the lies that Autism Speaks told them about people like me. No organization has done more harm to the community they claim to help.  It makes me sad that they are the leading resource doctors, therapists, businesses, and everyone else, looks to when seeking information about autism.  How can they be the leading resource when they do not even consult with Autistic people in any meaningful roles?  https://www.autismspeaks.org/about-us/board-directors It’s time for people to stop listening to Autism Speaks, and start listening to Autistic people.

 

This blog entry has several things going through my mind. First, I think I’ll let this marinate a little while for you guys to read. Then I’ll post my own thoughts. But first, please let me emphasize this for other non-autistic parents of autistic children: our children’s opinions on autistic matters including themselves are more important than our own. Who knows what’s better for someone than the people that are having policies and decisions and social discussions about them? I think this reblogged entry I just shared is one that we need to pay attention to, because it’s a common theme among adult autistic self-advocates. 

 

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I ended up wearing rainbow colors that day that I wrote about doing anything, even wearing blue. I just… I realized that supporting her meant more than wearing the blue because it’s her favorite and she asked me and she thought I’d be celebrating her. It meant so, so much more and I tried to explain why I wore a rainbow-flower skirt with a purple shirt (my own favorite color) in a way she could understand. But how do you explain that wearing blue, lighting it up blue, is a trigger event and silences Autistic Voices? That anything explaining away why it’s okay is really not okay?

And that’s what I think I did in that entry, and I wholeheartedly apologize, no qualifications.

So how did I explain to my daughter why I broke the blue promise…

Rainbows and flowers are love, and everyone loves flowers. Autism is full of wonderful colors, not just blue, and even if the flowers in my skirt were fuzzy at the edges they were far prettier than puzzle pieces all over the school walls. She nodded in agreement.

I told her that I wanted her to be able to choose from all of the colors in the rainbow when she’s making friends, when she’s thinking, when she’s getting dressed, when she’s looking outside, all just like when she’s painting or making crafts. She nodded more with each example.

I told her that an agency named Autism $peaks created the Light It Up Blue idea, and that we don’t like all of their ideas because some of their ideas include wanting to cure Autism. I asked her if she remembered hearing about that several days before, and she nodded with a Very Serious Expression on her face.

Then I explained that there are other supportive agencies that want to help her and others like her grow and be happy, and learn to be a self-advocate as she grows up and becomes a teenager and an adult.

I explained that sometimes we were going to have to have different kinds of conversations now about how some people think Autism is not a good thing and how we can change those ideas by showing them the good things and teaching them about the ideas that they don’t quite have right. That sometimes people believe things about Autism that aren’t true, but that we can help educate them. She nodded. She seemed to like the idea of being an educator instead of the student.

I explained that there would be times we would be talking about the better ideas that Mommy has read about from the good agencies so that Mommy can better understand who is a helper and who is not… and that I think she’s getting old enough to learn those things too.

She nodded her head, with a furrowed brow, and said, “Mm hmm.”

“Do you have any questions?”

“Can I still wear my blue skirt?”

“Yes. Always. You can even keep blue as your own favorite color.”

“Mm hmm. Yes.”

“Do you want to ask me more?”

“I don’t know.”

She walked away. So that was that.

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Great way of showing what I’ve been trying to say, but more succinctly. Check out this post below from Jess at Diary of a Mom.

communication | a diary of a mom.

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April 1st: Rainbow of RosesMy Sweet Girl loves blue. Of course, she also likes green, pink, and purple, but she says she loves blue the best.

Last year she started to notice that her elementary school was taking part in encouraging the students ahead of time to wear blue and “light it up blue” for April 2nd in order to show solidarity and celebrate Autism. They teach the children about Autism and why it’s important to be accepting of differences, and how autistic children and teens and adults might think differently but are still just the same as everyone else. They show the children the positives, but also teach the children that there can be difficulties, challenges, obstacles, that might be hard for them to understand if they aren’t autistic themselves, and it’s very important to know that they don’t have to be afraid. They shouldn’t bully children that show autistic behaviors, but should be friends with them and protect them. They don’t have to accept being bullied themselves by anyone, and if they see a child that they think might have disabilities such as happens with Autism, they should speak up.

Now, this isn’t what my Sweet Girl told me. She came home and told me that the whole school dresses up on April 2nd in her favorite color, blue, especially and specifically to celebrate her.  As a 6th grader she plans to wear blue tomorrow to celebrate herself.

I learned that this is what the elementary students are being taught by a neighbor’s daughter this morning because she was so excited to tell me about having learned about Autism in school to prepare for tomorrow. She’s excited to learn more, and she’s even more excited that she can share positive experiences with classmates because she’s at our house nearly every day. I remember how sad she was when she heard that there are people who would want to cure Autism and prevent people from being born with it. She immediately said, “But then there wouldn’t be awesome people like G!”

This morning my neighbor girl also told me how much she enjoys Sweet Girl and there are lots of things she loves that Sweet Girl does. Her very favorite thing is when I hold up my hand to give a high five, and Sweet Girl goes to give me a fist bump instead… but when I hold up my hand to give her a fist bump she puts up her own hand to give me a high five. She loves Sweet Girl’s sense of humor; she loves seeing how Sweet Girl can start her morning routine with the worst of moods and then change it around by helping me bake muffins or smelling coffee and giggling that giggle that Sweet Girl does.

Those are the things she wants to share. We’ve turned our little 9 year old neighbor into an advocate and ally already. ;-)  She plans to wear blue head to toe in honor of Sweet Girl.

This does present a dilemma in my own mind because these girls really don’t connect lighting themselves up blue with the damage done by Autism $peaks. How do I tell these children that they shouldn’t because it’s offensive to those of us who know what it’s connected to? That if they come across an autistic individual who would be offended knowing the significance as a self-advocate, it could cause a trigger effect for that person that could last hours or days? How do I justify taking away their excitement to learn more positive things and their desire to educate and not just make people aware but ACCEPTING?

These kids get it, you know… that it’s about accepting now and not just awareness. After all I think that there are probably only 12 people left in the developed world that have never heard of Autism. As a nation, we’re definitely aware. The problem is that as a nation, we’re not educated and we’re definitely not accepting. We can’t even accept disabilities as a whole let alone Autism. We have a self-proclaimed Autism support agency, Autism $peaks, who takes donations and doesn’t put them towards services but towards research that would try to find cures and prevention. We have parents who try to murder their disabled children, and apologists for them who “understand what they’re going through” hoping courts will be lenient and demanding others not judge them. We have comedians making vicious fun of disabled people. We have musicians writing offensive song lyrics against autistic people. We have every day people using the word autistic as a slur and an insult just as they use stupid, moron, idiot, and dumb (all ableist language).

These kids are getting it. This is why I support mainstream education rather than separating the students that have disabilities from the non-disabled students. It’s not just about educating them and telling them in a Do As I Say, Not As I Do situation. It’s about seeing each other as equals because heads up, they are, and treating them as such because guess what, they are. It’s about learning that being different doesn’t mean less, and it doesn’t mean segregation. It shows all of the children, including the children with disabilities, that we ALL have challenges and obstacles and we all need different kinds of help.

It teaches more than tolerance, more than awareness… it teaches acceptance. A quiet, natural acceptance.

A major issue with what April as Autism Awareness Month means is that for the teen and adult self-advocates that are aware and educated about the intricacies of the history of how society treats disabled individuals; that have been through traumatic experiences as they’ve grown up for various reasons at the hands of their parents, peers, education, therapies; how society specifically currently views Autism as a whole; and last but not least the intense spotlight that this “awareness month” puts on Autistic individuals is this:

It’s not the right kind of attention for many Autistics.  It’s anxiety inducing.

Donations often go to agencies that are not supportive of Autism at all, nor of Autism Services (Autism $peaks I’m looking at you).

It’s a huge burden to bear to be the face of Autism for an entire month.

It’s a huge burden to bear to be expected to educate people for an entire month.

It’s a huge burden to bear to have to argue with parents who have not accepted their child’s neuro-diversity even if their child is in their  40’s or 50’s.

It’s a huge burden to bear to be expected to “overcome” their disabilities or show them off for others.

It’s an even worse burden to have to defend being Autistic in a world that still wants to cure you and insists that it needs to prevent Autism in others. Autistics around the world feel that if their parents wished they weren’t Autistic, that if they could stamp it out, then they’re also wishing they were stamped out. There is no distinction between their person-hood and their autism.

It’s not fair when parents use this month to spotlight how much they hate Autism, causing Autistics around the world to feel that they are hated. If you hate Autism, they feel you must hate them as well. That’s a reasonable feeling. There is no distinction between their person-hood and their autism.

I can’t say that I disagree.

That’s an awful lot to bear. That’s why at only 12 years old, I’m really not sure that I want to take the joy out of my daughter’s eyes when she sees her classmates wearing blue because her interpretation is that it’s all in her personal honor. It’s Sweet Girl Day tomorrow. I know she’ll ask me to wear blue for her, just as she did last year. I sigh as I write this because I know the social implications, but for my daughter? I’ll do anything. Maybe I’ll wear a multi-colored something.

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